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The case of the keyhole wasp

Pachodynerus nasidens (Hymenoptera: Vespid) By Alan P.N. House, Jackson G. Ring, Matthew J. Hill, Phillip P. Shaw While birds and other vertebrates are well-known hazards to aviation at airports, the threat posed by invertebrates is less well understood. Highlights Potentially catastrophic threat to aircraft from the introduced keyhole wasp Nesting in pitot probes leads to …

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New Zealand Airports Association Conference 2019

Picture: from l. to r.—Nicolaas, Tim, Jill and Anil. ‘An airport’s best friend: using dogs for wildlife hazard management’ Jill Brix, Avisure’s Principal Aviation Consultant, was invited to speak at the New Zealand Airports Conference 2019 held in Auckland on the 23-25th October. Jill presented ‘An airport’s best friend: using dogs for wildlife hazard management’ …

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Integrated wildlife hazard management program – the Royal New Zealand Air Force journey

By Jill Brix, Principal Aviation Consultant, Avisure Maintaining operational readiness and airfield capability is critical for the Royal New Zealand Air Force (RNZAF) who operate a small, but heavily committed, aircraft fleet. Wildlife hazards are of particular concern as any conflict between aircraft and wildlife can result in serious damage, injury to aircrew and a …

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Grass tree inflorescence removal – passive management

Native and introduced flora species can have an impact on wildlife populations in Australia as they can provide a source of food and shelter. Grass trees (Xanthorrhoea sp.) are a native Australian species that have been known to attract hazardous species, such as flying-foxes, when they flower. Some airports in Australia have grass trees in …

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Alexandra Stone – Young Airports Professional scholarship winner

Winner of the Australian Airports Association’s (AAA) 2019 scholarship. Avisure’s Wildlife Biologist, Alexandra Stone, was one of the winners of the Australian Airports Association’s (AAA) 2019 scholarship to attend the national conference on the Gold Coast. Thanks to Melissa Evans and Canberra Airport, Alexandra attended all four days of the national conference as a Young …

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Is it a black kite or a whistling kite?

Managing wildlife hazards can be complex, and requires not just aviation expertise, but an understanding of wildlife and how to manage it by Jill Brix, Principal Aviation Consultant, Avisure A common question many aerodrome reporting officers (ARO) ask themselves when doing their regular bird counts or completing aerodrome patrols to check for wildlife hazards. And …

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Aviation safety bulletin: misrepresentation of lasers used for airport wildlife management

AVIATION SAFETY BULLETIN, March 2017 MISREPRESENTATION OF LASERS USED FOR AIRPORT WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT. SHORT FORM Green 532nm lasers have proved useful for dispersing wildlife away from critical flight paths, thereby reducing the risk of collision between aircraft and wildlife (wildlife strike).    However recent incidents in Europe, Oceania and North America have shown that some lasers …

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Vale Joe

Joe was the first bird dispersal dog to work on an Australian airport. In 2009, things were not looking too good for Joe—he was unwanted and surrendered to a dog shelter. Fortunately, at the same time, Phil Shaw was looking for a canine addition to the Avisure wildlife management team to help Gold Coast airport …

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